Archive

Archive for September 27, 2011

NASA Spacecraft Reveals New Details Of Planet Mercury

September 27, 2011 Leave a comment

NASA will host a media teleconference at 2 p.m. EDT on Thursday, Sept. 29, to discuss new data and images from the first spacecraft to orbit Mercury.

NASA’s MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft conducted fifteen laps through the inner solar system for more than six years before achieving the historic orbit insertion on March 18.

Full Story: http://www.nasa.gov/home/hqnews/2011/sep/HQ_M11-207_MESSENGER_Telecon.html

NASA Announces California Tweetup To Tour Airborne Observatory

September 27, 2011 Leave a comment

NASA will host a Tweetup for 50 of its Twitter followers on Oct. 14 at the agency’s Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, Calif. The Tweetup includes a tour of the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) aircraft, which will visit Ames.

SOFIA is a highly modified Boeing 747SP aircraft that carries a telescope with a 100-inch reflecting mirror to conduct astronomy research not possible with ground-based telescopes. SOFIA is housed at NASA’s Dryden Aircraft Operations Facility in Palmdale, Calif.

In addition to climbing aboard SOFIA, the Tweetup guests will speak with NASA officials, managers and SOFIA scientists. The Tweetup will include a session where participants can mingle with fellow Tweeps and the staff behind the tweets on @NASA, @NASAAmes and @SOFIATelescope.

Full Story: http://www.nasa.gov/home/hqnews/2011/sep/HQ_11-325_SOFIA_Tweetup.html

NASA Partners Uncover New Hypothesis on Crater Debris

September 27, 2011 Leave a comment

A team of researchers partnered with the NASA Lunar Science Institute (NLSI) has developed a new hypothesis for the origin of crater ejecta–debris that is launched out of a crater during meteorite impacts.

These findings may help scientists target samples for extraction during future missions to asteroids and terrestrial bodies such as Mercury, Venus, the moon and Mars. The results are published in the Sept. 21, 2011, issue of the Elsevier journal, Earth and Planetary Science Letters.

The science team, led by professor Gordon Osinski at The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, compared observations of ejecta from all terrestrial planets. The observations showed that ejecta deposits all contained more than one layer.

Full Story: http://www.astronews.us/2011-09-27-0129.html