Home > Astronomy, Black Holes, Galaxies, General Astronomy, Observatories & Facilities > Hubble Zooms In on Andromeda’s Double Nucleus

Hubble Zooms In on Andromeda’s Double Nucleus


Credit: NASA, ESA, and T. Lauer (National Optical Astronomy Observatory)

Credit: NASA, ESA, and T. Lauer (National Optical Astronomy Observatory)

A new Hubble Space Telescope image centers on the 100-million-solar-mass black hole at the hub of the neighboring spiral galaxy M31, or the Andromeda galaxy, the only galaxy outside the Milky Way visible to the naked eye and the only other giant galaxy in the local group.

This is the sharpest visible-light image ever made of the nucleus of an external galaxy.

The event horizon, the closest region around the black hole where light can still escape, is too small to be seen, but it lies near the middle of a compact cluster of blue stars at the center of the image. The compact cluster of blue stars is surrounded by the larger “double nucleus” of M31, discovered with the Hubble Space Telescope in 1992. The double nucleus is actually an elliptical ring of old reddish stars in orbit around the black hole but more distant than the blue stars. When the stars are at the farthest point in their orbit they move slower, like cars on a crowded freeway. This gives the illusion of a second nucleus.

Full Story: http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/hubble/science/double-nucleus.html

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