Home > Astronomy, Galaxies, General Astronomy, Observatories & Facilities > Lowell’s NSF-Funded Large Monolithic Imager Sees First Light On The Discovery Channel Telescope

Lowell’s NSF-Funded Large Monolithic Imager Sees First Light On The Discovery Channel Telescope


 

Galaxy NGC 891 as imaged by the Large Monolithic Imager (Lowell Observatory)

The Large Monolithic Imager (LMI), a camera built at Lowell Observatory and funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF), recently took a set of first-light images on Lowell’s 4.3-m Discovery Channel Telescope (DCT). At the heart of the LMI is the largest charge-coupled device (CCD) that can be built using current fabrication techniques and the first of its kind to be made by e2v. The 36-megapixel CCD’s active surface is 3.7 inches on a side. The LMI’s ability to provide much more accurate measurements of the faint light around galaxies separates it from cameras that use a mosaic of CCDs to produce images.

The attached first-light image is of NGC 891, an edge-on spiral galaxy about 30 million light-years away in the Andromeda constellation. The image was obtained by Lowell’s Phil Massey, Ted Dunham, and Mike Sweaton, and then turned into a beautiful color composite by Kathryn Neugent. The exposure consisted of 10×1 min (B), 5×1 min (V), and 6×1 min (R), all unguided.

Full Story: http://www.lowell.edu/news/2012/09/lowells-nsf-funded-large-monolithic-imager-sees-first-light-on-the-discovery-channel-telescope/

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