Home > Astronomy, Astrophysics, General Astronomy, Supernovae > Pan-STARRS Finds A “Lost” Supernova

Pan-STARRS Finds A “Lost” Supernova


The star Eta Carinae is ready to blow. 170 years ago, this 100-solar-mass object belched out several suns’ worth of gas in an eruption that made it the second-brightest star after Sirius. That was just a precursor to the main event, since it will eventually go supernova.

Supernova explosions of massive stars are common in spiral galaxies like the Milky Way, where new stars are forming all the time. They are almost never seen in elliptical galaxies where star formation has nearly ceased. As a result, astronomers were surprised to find a young-looking supernova in an old galaxy. Supernova PS1-12sk, discovered with the Pan-STARRS telescope on Haleakala, is rare in more ways than one.

“This supernova is one-of-a-kind,” said Nathan Sanders of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA), lead author of the discovery paper. “And it’s definitely in the wrong neighborhood.”

Based on the presence of helium and other features, PS1-12sk is classified as a very rare Type Ibn supernova – only the sixth such example found out of thousands of supernovae. Although the origin of this supernova type is unclear, the most likely cause seems to be the explosion of a massive star that previously ejected massive amounts of helium gas, much like Eta Carinae’s Homunculus Nebula.

Full Story: http://www.cfa.harvard.edu/news/2013/pr201308.html

  1. March 13, 2013 at 1:58 pm

    Reblogged this on STEM – ROBOTICS EDUCATION.

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