Home > Astronomy, General Astronomy, Supernovae > Naked-Eye Nova In Delphinus

Naked-Eye Nova In Delphinus


Last Wednesday a white-dwarf star erupted in the constellation Delphinus, producing the brightest nova since 2007. Currently shining at magnitude 4.9, the nova is visible to the naked eye from dark locations far from city lights, and might remain so for weeks to come.

“The nova is easy to locate north of the lovely star pattern of Delphinus. And the constellation Sagitta, the Arrow, points right toward it,” says Tony Flanders, associate editor of Sky & Telescope and host of S&T’s PBS TV show SkyWeek.

“A second advantage is the nova’s location. It’s easily visible in the eastern sky in the early evening, so it can be followed for many hours. This means that amateur skygazers and professional scientists alike can continue monitoring it for months to come,” adds Arne Henden, director of the American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO). “The nova can be seen with binoculars even from light-polluted metropolitan areas. Hundreds of observers, many for the first time, have submitted brightness estimates of the nova to the AAVSO.”

Full Story: http://www.skyandtelescope.com/about/pressreleases/Naked-eye-Nova-in-Delphinus-220235341.html

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  1. August 22, 2013 at 8:49 am
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