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Small, But Plentiful: How The Faintest Galaxies Illuminated The Early Universe


Astronomers investigating behaviour of the universe shortly after the Big Bang have made a surprising discovery: the properties of the early universe are determined by the smallest galaxies. The team report their findings in a paper published today in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.

Shortly after the Big Bang, the universe was ionised: ordinary matter consisted of hydrogen with its positively charged protons stripped of their negatively charged electrons. Eventually, the universe cooled enough for electrons and protons to combine and form neutral hydrogen. This cool gas will eventually form the first stars in the universe but for millions of years, there are no stars. Astronomers therefore aren’t able to see how the cosmos evolved during these ‘dark ages’ using conventional telescopes. The light returned when newly forming stars and galaxies re-ionised the universe during the ‘epoch of re-ionisation’.

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