Home > Astronomy, Astrophysics, General Astronomy > ASU Astrophysicists To Probe How Early Universe Made Chemical Elements

ASU Astrophysicists To Probe How Early Universe Made Chemical Elements


Photo by: Gemini Observatory artwork by Lynette Cook

Photo by: Gemini Observatory artwork by Lynette Cook

In the beginning, all was hydrogen – and helium, plus a bit of lithium. Three elements in all. Today’s universe, however, has nearly a hundred naturally occurring elements, with thousands of variants (isotopes), and more likely to come.

Figuring out how the universe got from its starting batch of three elements to the menagerie found today is the focus of a new Physics Frontiers Center research grant to Arizona State University’s School of Earth and Space Exploration (SESE). The grant is from the National Science Foundation’s Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics – Center for the Evolution of the Elements. Of the full $11.4 million NSF grant, about $1 million will come to ASU over five years.

SESE astrophysicist Frank Timmes is the lead scientist for ASU’s part of the Physics Frontiers Center research project. Timmes, ASU’s director of advanced computing, focuses his astrophysical research on supernovae, cosmic chemical evolution, their impacts on astrobiology and high-performance computing. He is also a scientific editor of The Astrophysical Journal.

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