Home > Astronomy, Astrophysics, Black Holes, General Astronomy, Stars > ‘Perfect Storm’ Quenching Star Formation Around A Supermassive Black Hole

‘Perfect Storm’ Quenching Star Formation Around A Supermassive Black Hole


A combined Hubble Space Telescope / ALMA image of NGC 1266. Credit: NASA/ESA Hubble; ALMA (NRAO/ESO/NAOJ)

A combined Hubble Space Telescope / ALMA image of NGC 1266. Credit: NASA/ESA Hubble; ALMA (NRAO/ESO/NAOJ)

High-energy jets powered by supermassive black holes can blast away a galaxy’s star-forming fuel, resulting in so-called “red and dead” galaxies: those brimming with ancient red stars yet containing little or no hydrogen gas to create new ones.

Now astronomers using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) have discovered that black holes don’t have to be nearly so powerful to shut down star formation. By observing the dust and gas at the center of NGC 1266, a nearby lenticular galaxy with a relatively modest central black hole, the astronomers have detected a “perfect storm” of turbulence that is squelching star formation in a region that would otherwise be an ideal star factory.

This turbulence is stirred up by jets from the galaxy’s central black hole slamming into an incredibly dense envelope of gas. This dense region, which may be the result of a recent merger with another smaller galaxy, blocks nearly 98 percent of material propelled by the jets from escaping the galactic center.

Link To Full Story

Advertisements
  1. No comments yet.
  1. No trackbacks yet.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: