Home > Antimatter, Astronomy, Astrophysics, Gamma Ray Bursts, General Astronomy, Magnetic Fields > Left-Handed Cosmic Magnetic Field Could Explain Missing Antimatter

Left-Handed Cosmic Magnetic Field Could Explain Missing Antimatter


An artist’s concept of the Fermi Gamma ray Space Telescope (FGST) in orbit. Credit: NASA

An artist’s concept of the Fermi Gamma ray Space Telescope (FGST) in orbit. Credit: NASA

The discovery of a ‘left-handed’ magnetic field that pervades the universe could help explain a long standing mystery – the absence of cosmic antimatter. A group of scientists, led by Prof Tanmay Vachaspati from Arizona State University in the United States, with collaborators at the University of Washington and Nagoya University, announce their result in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.

Planets, stars, gas and dust are almost entirely made up of ‘normal’ matter of the kind we are familiar with on Earth. But theory predicts that there should be a similar amount of antimatter, like normal matter, but with the opposite charge. For example, an antielectron or positron has the same mass as its conventional counterpart, but a positive rather than negative charge.

In 2001 Prof Vachaspati published theoretical models to try to solve this puzzle, which predict that the entire universe is filled with helical (screw-like) magnetic fields. He and his team were inspired to search for evidence of these fields in data from the NASA Fermi Gamma ray Space Telescope (FGST).

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