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Archive for the ‘Conjunctions’ Category

Slooh Space Camera To Broadcast Live Feeds Of Super Close Moon / Jupiter Conjunction

January 18, 2013 Leave a comment

On Monday, January 21st, the Moon will appear amazingly close in the sky to the largest planet in our solar system, Jupiter. In North America, the waxing gibbous Moon — the lunar phase between first quarter and full Moon — will be approximately one degree south of Jupiter, appearing to be only a pen width (seen at arm’s length) apart. Slooh Space Camera will cover the event live on Slooh.com, free to the public, Monday, January 21st, at 6:00 p.m. PST / 9:00 p.m. EST / 02:00 UTC (1/22) — international times here: http://goo.gl/xySeo — accompanied by real-time discussions with Slooh president Patrick Paolucci, Astronomy magazine columnist Bob Berman, and astro-imager Matt Francis of the Prescott Observatory. Viewers can watch live on their PC or iOS/Android mobile device at t-minus zero.

Text & Links (PDF): http://goo.gl/dMxik
Event Times: http://www.timeanddate.com/worldclock/fixedtime.html?msg=Super+Close+Moon+%2F+Jupiter+Conjunction&iso=20130121T18&p1=137
Slooh Space Camera G+ Page: https://plus.google.com/u/0/108176209664415419112/#108176209664415419112/posts

Live Feed of Venus-Pleiades Conjunction, Apr. 3


Slooh Space Camera will broadcast a free, real-time feed of the most famous star cluster in the heavens, the Pleiades, meeting up with our nearest and brightest planetary neighbor, Venus. Slooh’s coverage will begin on Tuesday, April 3rd starting at 1:30 PM PDT / 4:30 PM EDT / 20:30 UT. Slooh will provide an observatory feed from our world class observatory site in Canary Islands off the coast of Africa. The broadcast can be accessed at Slooh’s homepage or by visiting Slooh’s G+ page, where you will be able to see the panel interact live via G+ Hangouts On Air.

The Pleiades, otherwise known as the Seven Sisters, is a beautiful bright blue open star cluster 440 light years from Earth. The relative tightness of the cluster is indicative of its young age as the member stars were formed some 100 million years ago and will probably travel together through space as a bound cluster for another 250 million years before the gravity of the Milky Way breaks up the cluster into individual field stars. The central core radius of the cluster is only about 4.5 light years but the remote outer regions of the cluster may extend out as far as 52 light years from the center. The brighter members of the cluster, which make up the Seven Sisters, are blue stars with surface temperatures of about 20,000 degrees which is four times hotter than our own Sun.

Venus is sometimes called the Earth’s sister planet because they are so close in size. However, Venus is very different in many ways, with an atmosphere almost 100 times thicker than Earth’s composed of sulfuric acid and carbon dioxide. Even though it is only slightly closer to the Sun, the surface of Venus averages 900 degrees making it the hottest place in the solar system outside the Sun itself.

While Venus and Pleiades are hundreds of light years apart, they will appear together as neighbors in the same field of view. Venus will pass just below the bright blue star cluster. This incredible event happens only once every eight years.

Full Story: http://www.slooh.com/pr/slooh-live-feed-venus-pleiades-conjunction-april-2012.php

Venus and Jupiter Dance at Dusk


For the past month the two brightest planets, Venus and Jupiter, have been an eye-catching duo in the western sky after sunset. Week by week they’ve been gradually sliding closer together, and their celestial performance is about to culminate.

By March 9th these dazzling evening “stars” are less than 5° apart, about the width of three fingers at arm’s length. Then, from March 12th to 14th, the gap between them closes to just 3° as they pass one another in the evening sky. The pairing of these bright lights will be dramatic, though not especially rare.

Full Story: http://www.skyandtelescope.com/about/pressreleases/Venus-and-Jupiter-Dance-at-Dusk-141702683.html

Live Feed of Sunday’s Venus-Jupiter Conjunction


Slooh Space Camera will broadcast a free, real-time feed of the Venus and Jupiter conjunction Sunday, 3/11 starting at 02:30 UT / 7:30 PM PDT / 10:30 EDT. Slooh will provide multiple observatory feeds, including from Arizona and the Canary Islands off the coast of Africa. The broadcast can be accessed at Slooh’s homepage or by visiting Slooh’s G+ page, where you will be able to see the panel interact live via G+ Hangouts On Air.

Media websites can embed Slooh’s live syndicated image feed directly into their own coverage of the event by visiting Slooh’s media page.

In addition to the conjunction, Slooh will provide live views of several planets, including Jupiter, Saturn, and Mars using Slooh’s patented imaging technology. In addition, we will take an up close look at our nearest neighbor, the Moon.

If skies are clear, individuals can view the conjunction by looking toward the west, the first three hours after sunset.

Slooh’s own Patrick Paolucci will join Astronomy Magazine columnist Bob Berman along with other guests and Slooh members to discuss the event live and in true color.

Full Story: http://www.slooh.com/pr/slooh-live-feed-conjunction-march-2012.php

Notable Celestial Events in 2012

February 23, 2012 2 comments

This is from Journey to the Stars astronomy blog – check it out, it’s got a lot of great info 🙂

Notable Celestial Events in 2012.

Space Camera to Broadcast Moon-Planet Conjunctions

February 22, 2012 Leave a comment

Slooh Space Camera will broadcast a free, real-time feed of the Venus/Moon and Jupiter/Moon conjunction Saturday 2/25 and Sunday, 2/26 starting at 02:30 UT / 6:30 PM PST / 9:30 EST. Slooh will provide multiple observatory feeds, including from Arizona and the Canary Islands off the coast of Africa. The broadcast can be accessed at Slooh’s homepage or by visiting Slooh’s G+ page, where you will be able to see the panel interact live via G+ Hangouts On Air.

Conjunctions are amazing phenomena to behold as viewers will be able to see both the Moon and planet Venus or Jupiter nearby in the same field of view. Individuals can also attempt to view the conjunction using binoculars pointed at the Moon.

Slooh’s own Patrick Paolucci will join Astronomy Magazine columnist Bob Berman along with other guests and Slooh members to discuss the event live and in true color.

Full Story: http://www.slooh.com/pr/slooh-live-feed-conjunction-february-2012.php