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Archive for the ‘Solar Eclipses’ Category

Slooh Space Camera To Broadcast Annular Solar Eclipse With Ring Of Fire Live From Australia


Slooh Space Camera will broadcast a free, real-time view of the annular solar eclipse from Australia. Viewers can capture a first look of the eclipse on Slooh.com, Thursday, May 9th, starting at 2:30 p.m. PDT / 5:30 p.m. EDT / 21:30 UTC as the Moon’s shadow begins its journey over Australia on its way to eastern Papua New Guinea, the Solomon Islands, the Gilbert Islands, and finally over the Pacific Ocean. Viewers can watch live on their PC/Mac or by downloading the free Slooh iPad app in the iTunes store and touching the broadcast icon.

Full Text (PDF): http://images.slooh.com/files/press_release/annular_2013.pdf
Video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_MZQRFIxJiY&feature=youtu.be

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Eclipse Calculator: A New Application To Simulate Eclipses On Your Mobile, Developed At The UB

January 20, 2013 Leave a comment

Which future eclipses will be visible from my location? How will they be like? How long will they last? These are some of the questions answered by the new application Eclipse Calculator, designed for Android mobiles by the researcher from the UB Eduard Masana.

It is a new appealing tool for those who love astronomy; it is easy to use and it provides information about all solar and lunar eclipses or planetary transits from 1900 to 2100. The application, public and free, can be downloaded from the Google Play website (https://play.google.com/store). At first, it has been developed in Catalan, Spanish and English, but it is planned to translate it to other languages.

Full Story: http://www.ub.edu/web/ub/en/menu_eines/noticies/2013/01/041.html

One Ring to Bring Them All: Eclipse Enchants Grand Canyon

June 13, 2012 Leave a comment

Ever see ringlets of sunlight playing in the shadows of a tree or a fiery ring of light in the sky? These incredible effects are the results of an annular solar eclipse like the one that occurred when the moon passed directly between the sun and Earth on Sunday, May 20, 2012. The event was viewable from Japan all the way across the Pacific Ocean to midway through the United States.
Because the moon travels on a slightly tilted orbit compared to the plane of Earth’s orbit around the sun, eclipses do not occur every time the moon comes between the sun and Earth. However, there are two points or “nodes” when the moon does pass through this plane. If either of these nodes coincides with a new moon (when the sun is illuminating only its far side), a solar eclipse will occur. If a node is reached during a full moon, Earth will block the sun’s light, casting a shadow onto the moon causing a lunar eclipse.
An annular eclipse occurs when the moon is too far away from us to completely cover the disk of the sun. This results in an annularity: the ring-shaped outline of the sun that can be seen surrounding the dark new moon. Because of the surreal look of the “ring of fire,” annular eclipses are some of the most impressive celestial events visible from Earth.
This eclipse passed over some of the U.S.’s most famous national parks with the full annularity visible from 33 parks, while an additional 125 parks witnessed a partial eclipse. The NASA Lunar Science Institute (NLSI) at NASA’s Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, Calif., and the National Parks Service took advantage of this rare event and joined forces to facilitate safe viewings for as many people as possible.

Full Story: http://www.nasa.gov/centers/ames/news/features/2012/annular-eclipse.html

Hinode Mission to Capture Annular Solar Eclipse This Weekend


On May 20-21, 2012 an annular eclipse of the Sun will be visible from within a narrow corridor along Earth’s northern Hemisphere — beginning in eastern Asia, crossing the North Pacific Ocean, and ending in the western United States. A partial eclipse will be visible from a much larger region covering East Asia, North Pacific, North America and Greenland.

The joint JAXA/NASA Hinode mission will observe the eclipse and provide images and movies that will be available on the NASA website at http://www.nasa.gov/sunearth. Due to Hinode’s orbit around the Earth, Hinode will actually observe 4 separate partial eclipses.” Scientists often use an eclipse to help calibrate the instruments on the telescope by focusing in on the edge of the moon as it crosses the sun and measuring how sharp it appears in the images. An added bonus: Hinode’s X-ray Telescope will be able to provide images of the peaks and valleys of the lunar surface.

Full Story: http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/sunearth/news/eclipse-2012.html

Slooh Space Camera to Broadcast Live Feed of Annular Solar Eclipse from Japan to the United States


Slooh Space Camera will broadcast a free, real-time feed of the Annular Solar Eclipse live from telescope feeds in Japan, California, Arizona, and New Mexico. Viewers can capture a first look of the eclipse on Slooh, Sunday, May 20th starting at 2:30 PM PDT / 5:30 PM EDT / 21:30 UTC as the Moon’s shadow begins its journey over Japan. Slooh will track the eclipse as it leaves Japan and lands on the shores of the Western United States starting at 5:00 PM PDT / 8:00 PM EDT / 00:00 UTC (5/21), where their professional broadcast team of astronomy luminaries and solar experts will pick-up the event and explain what you are seeing.

The full broadcast can be accessed at Slooh’s homepage, where viewers will be able to snap and share eclipse pics directly from Slooh live feeds to their Pinterest boards. Furthermore, viewers will be treated to an impressive panel of guests, including BBC contributor, Dr. Lucie Green, solar researcher at the Mullard Space Science Laboratory, UCL’s Department of Space and Climate Physics, and Bob Berman, author of The Sun’s Heartbeat and contributing editor and monthly columnist for Astronomy Magazine.

Full Story: http://www.slooh.com/pr/slooh-live-feed-annular-eclipse-may-2012.php

Partial — and Annular — Eclipse of the Sun


People with clear skies across most of the U.S., Canada, and Mexico will experience a partial eclipse of the Sun late this Sunday afternoon (May 20, 2012). Only those near the Eastern Seaboard will miss out.

And, if you happen to be in a swath of land running from Northern California to Texas, you’ll also get a very special kind of partial eclipse: an annular eclipse, in which the rim of the Sun becomes a brilliant ring completely encircling the black silhouette of the Moon.

The Sun will be moving down the afternoon sky when a dark dent begins to intrude into one edge. The dent will deepen, eventually turning the Sun into a fat crescent — or, for western half of the continent, a thin crescent. The dent is the silhouette of the new Moon traveling along its monthly orbit around the Earth.

Most Westerners can see the entire eclipse from beginning to end before sunset. Farther east, sunset puts an end to the show while the eclipse is still in progress — affording weird and spectacular sunset scenes just above the west-northwest horizon. “This is going to be a great photo opportunity,” suggests Robert Naeye, editor in chief of Sky & Telescope magazine.

Full Story: http://www.skyandtelescope.com/about/pressreleases/Partial-151-and-Annular-151-Eclipse-of-the-Sun-to-Sweep-North-America-Sunday-May-20th-150977245.html