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NASA Voyager: ‘Tsunami Wave’ Still Flies Through Interstellar Space

December 16, 2014 Leave a comment

Artist's concept. Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Artist’s concept. Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

• The Voyager 1 spacecraft has experienced three shock waves

• The most recent shock wave, first observed in February 2014, still appears to be going on

• One wave, previously reported, helped researchers determine that Voyager 1 had entered interstellar space

The “tsunami wave” that NASA’s Voyager 1 spacecraft began experiencing earlier this year is still propagating outward, according to new results. It is the longest-lasting shock wave that researchers have seen in interstellar space.

“Most people would have thought the interstellar medium would have been smooth and quiet. But these shock waves seem to be more common than we thought,” said Don Gurnett, professor of physics at the University of Iowa in Iowa City. Gurnett presented the new data Monday, Dec. 15 at the American Geophysical Union meeting in San Francisco.

Link To Full Story And Video

Voyager Spacecraft Might Not Have Reached Interstellar Space


In 2012, the Voyager mission team announced that the Voyager 1 spacecraft had passed into interstellar space, traveling further from Earth than any other manmade object.

But, in the nearly two years since that historic announcement, and despite subsequent observations backing it up, uncertainty about whether Voyager 1 really crossed the threshold continues. There are some scientists who say that the spacecraft is still within the heliosphere – the region of space dominated by the Sun and its wind of energetic particles – and has not yet reached the space between the stars.

Now, two Voyager team scientists have developed a test that they say could prove once and for all if Voyager 1 has crossed the boundary. The new test is outlined in a study accepted for publication in Geophysical Research Letters, a journal of the American Geophysical Union.

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Saturn’s Hexagon: An Amazing Phenomenon


Acknowledgements: Planetary Sciences Group UPV/EHU-Cassini NASA/ESA

Acknowledgements: Planetary Sciences Group UPV/EHU-Cassini NASA/ESA

An unusual structure with a hexagonal shape surrounding Saturn’s north pole was spotted on the planet for the first time thirty years ago. Nothing similar with such a regular geometry had ever been seen on any planet in the Solar System. The Planetary Sciences Group has now been able to study and measure the phenomenon and, among other achievements, establish its rotation period. What is more, this period could be the same as that of the planet itself. Saturn is the only planet in the Solar System whose rotation time remains unknown. The research illustrates the front cover of the journal Geophysical Research Letters and has been highlighted by the publication’s editor.

In 1980 and 1981 NASA’s Voyager 1 and 2 space probes passed for the first time over the planet Saturn, located 1,500 million km from the Sun. Among their numerous discoveries they observed a strange, hexagon-shaped structure in the planet’s uppermost clouds surrounding its north pole. The hexagon remained virtually static, without moving, vis-à-vis the planet’s overall rotation that was not accurately known. What is more, the images captured by the Voyager probes found that the clouds were moving rapidly inside the hexagon in an enclosed jet stream and were being dragged by winds travelling at over 400 km/h.

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NASA’s Voyager 1 Reaches Interstellar Space

September 19, 2013 Leave a comment

NASA’s Voyager 1 spacecraft officially is the first human-made object to venture into interstellar space. The 36-year-old probe is about 12 billion miles (19 billion kilometers) from our sun.

New and unexpected data indicate Voyager 1 has been traveling for about one year through the plasma, or ionized gas, present in the space between the stars. Voyager is in a transitional region immediately outside the solar bubble, where some effects from our sun are still evident. A report on the analysis of these new data, an effort led by Don Gurnett and the plasma wave science team at the University of Iowa, Iowa City, is published this week in the journal Science.

“The crossing is like Voyager leaving the hot, million-degree atmosphere of the sun and entering into a region dominated by the ‘cold,’ 5,000-degree atmosphere of the galaxy,” says APL’s Stamatios (Tom) Krimigis, principal investigator for Voyager’s Low-Energy Charged Particle (LECP) instrument. “It’s like the first time a satellite [Sputnik] went beyond Earth’s atmosphere to an altitude of some 600 miles; Voyager is now leaving the solar bubble at an altitude of 11.3 billion miles. It’s another historic milestone.”

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NASA Voyager Statement About Competing Models To Explain Recent Spacecraft Data

August 16, 2013 Leave a comment

A newly published paper argues that NASA’s Voyager 1 spacecraft has already entered interstellar space. The model described in the paper is new and different from other models used so far to explain the data the spacecraft has been sending back from more than 11 billion miles (18 billion kilometers) away from our sun.

NASA’s Voyager project scientist, Ed Stone of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, explains:

“Details of a new model have just been published that lead the scientists who created the model to argue that NASA’s Voyager 1 spacecraft data can be consistent with entering interstellar space in 2012. In describing on a fine scale how magnetic field lines from the sun and magnetic field lines from interstellar space can connect to each other, they conclude Voyager 1 has been detecting the interstellar magnetic field since July 27, 2012. Their model would mean that the interstellar magnetic field direction is the same as that which originates from our sun.

Full Story: http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/voyager/voyager20130815.html

NASA’s Voyager 1 Explores Final Frontier Of Our ‘Solar Bubble’

July 2, 2013 1 comment

Artist's concept. Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Artist’s concept. Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Data from Voyager 1, now more than 11 billion miles (18 billion kilometers) from the sun, suggest the spacecraft is closer to becoming the first human-made object to reach interstellar space.

Scientists have seen two of the three signs of interstellar arrival they expected to see: charged particles disappearing as they zoom out along the solar magnetic field, and cosmic rays from far outside zooming in. Scientists have not yet seen the third sign, an abrupt change in the direction of the magnetic field, which would indicate the presence of the interstellar magnetic field.

“This strange, last region before interstellar space is coming into focus, thanks to Voyager 1, humankind’s most distant scout,” said Ed Stone, Voyager project scientist at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena. “If you looked at the cosmic ray and energetic particle data in isolation, you might think Voyager had reached interstellar space, but the team feels Voyager 1 has not yet gotten there because we are still within the domain of the sun’s magnetic field.”

Full Story: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?release=2013-209
Also: http://www.jhuapl.edu/newscenter/pressreleases/2013/130627.asp

Voyager 1 Has Entered A New Region Of Space, Sudden Changes In Cosmic Rays Indicate


Thirty-five years after its launch, Voyager 1 appears to have travelled beyond the influence of the Sun and exited the heliosphere, according to a new study appearing online today (March 20).

The heliosphere is a region of space dominated by the Sun and its wind of energetic particles, and which is thought to be enclosed, bubble-like, in the surrounding interstellar medium of gas and dust that pervades the Milky Way galaxy.

On August 25, 2012, NASA’s Voyager 1 spacecraft measured drastic changes in radiation levels, more than 11 billion miles from the Sun. Anomalous cosmic rays, which are cosmic rays trapped in the outer heliosphere, all but vanished, dropping to less than 1 percent of previous amounts. At the same time, galactic cosmic rays – cosmic radiation from outside of the solar system – spiked to levels not seen since Voyager’s launch, with intensities as much as twice previous levels.

Full Story: http://www.agu.org/news/press/pr_archives/2013/2013-11.shtml
Also: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?release=2013-107