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Posts Tagged ‘aurorae’

Auroras Broadcast Live from Alaska, Mar. 22/23

March 20, 2012 Leave a comment

Solar activity is at its highest in years and Slooh Space Camera will capture the beauty and fire of one of natures most spectacular phenomena — The Aurora Borealis. Astronomer Bob Berman will be onsite outside of Fairbanks, Alaska at one of the best viewing sites in the world, reporting in as we view the beautiful blaze of the Northern Lights live and in true color.

The show will begin on Thursday. 3/22 starting at 11:00 PM PDT / 2:00 AM EDT (06:00 UTC on 3/23). The broadcast can be accessed at Slooh’s homepage or by visiting Slooh’s G+ page, where you will be able to see the panel interact live via G+ Hangouts On Air.

Media websites can embed Slooh’s live syndicated image feed directly into their own coverage of the event by visiting Slooh’s media page.

Viewing the Aurora Borealis is not easy unless the display is unusually intense, the auroral oval has thickened and moved south, you live in the northern third of the US, and observe away from city lights, where the sky is dark. However, central Alaska sits directly under the auroral oval and can see the Northern Lights most nights when the sun is active, like now.

Full Story: http://www.slooh.com/pr/slooh-live-feed-aurora-march-2012.php

New Observations & Details on Heliosphere & Aurora

November 1, 2011 Leave a comment

OBSERVATIONS IMPROVE UNDERSTANDING OF THE HELIOSPHERE

The outer regions of the heliosphere, a giant bubble around the solar system created by solar wind, are difficult to study directly. The Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) mission, which maps emission of energetic neutral atoms from the boundary between the heliosphere and the interstellar medium, has greatly contributed to understanding of the heliosphere and even discovered some unexpected features. In particular, IBEX maps show a strange “ribbon” of enhanced energetic neutral atom emission that was not predicted by any theory. The origins of this ribbon, which stretches more than 300 degrees across the sky, remain unknown. McComas et al. review IBEX observations, current understanding of the heliosphere, hypotheses that have been proposed to explain the ribbon, and directions for future research.

NEW DETAIL ON AURORAS

High-resolution imaging from spacecraft is revealing new detail on structures in bright, dynamic auroras. In the auroral regions where particles are accelerated to high energies, dynamic structures evolve on time scales of seconds or less, though the processes that drive particle acceleration and transfer of energy to small scales are not fully understood. Chaston et al. show how new spaceborne auroral imagery combined with simultaneous particle measurements can help improve understanding of the physical processes involved in the aurora. In particular, they show how magnetic reconnection (in which magnetic field lines break and reconnect, releasing energy), tearing, and sheared flows can transfer energy from larger to smaller scales and help form the auroral structures observed.

Full Story: http://www.agu.org/news/press/jhighlight_archives/2011/2011-10-31.shtml

Strong Solar Activity Could Spark Auroras

September 7, 2011 Leave a comment

On Sept. 6th, active sunspot 1283 produced two major eruptions including an impulsive X2-class solar flare.  The blasts hurled a pair of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) toward Earth, which could spark geomagnetic activity when they arrive on Sept. 8-10.  High-latitude sky watchers should be alert for auroras in the nights ahead.  Checkhttp://spaceweather.com for images and updates.

Full Story: http://spaceweather.com/archive.php?view=1&day=07&month=09&year=2011

Ultrafast Substorm Auroras Explained

September 7, 2011 Leave a comment

From time to time, sudden releases of energy in Earth’s magnetosphere lead to major disturbances that result in bright auroral displays over the planet’s polar regions. These auroras are caused by a phenomenon known as a geomagnetic substorm. The precise cause of these substorms has been debated for decades, but new computer simulations, allied to analysis of data from ESA’s Cluster spacecraft, are now filling in many of the missing pieces in the puzzle.

Full Story: http://sci.esa.int/science-e/www/object/index.cfm?fobjectid=49107

Journal Highlights on History of Mars, Dione’s Atmosphere & Saturn’s Aurora

August 31, 2011 Leave a comment

  • New observations from the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer
    for Mars (CRISM) show the presence of multiple magmatic intrusions in
    the Valles Marineris canyon on Mars
  • A new study indicates that one of Saturn’s moons, Dione, probably has
    a tenuous atmosphere.
  • New observations of Saturn’s southern auroral oval made simultaneously
    in ultraviolet (UV) and infrared (IR) wavelengths show how complex and
    dynamic the auroral oval is.

Full Story: http://www.agu.org/news/press/jhighlight_archives/2011/2011-08-31.shtml