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Posts Tagged ‘CERN’

Physicists Discover A New Particle That May Be The Higgs Boson


Physicists at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in Geneva, Switzerland, have discovered a new particle that may be the long-sought Higgs boson, the fundamental particle that is thought to endow elementary particles with mass.

“This is a momentous time in the history of particle physics and in scientific exploration—the implications are profound,” says Harvey Newman, professor of physics at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). “This is experimental science at its best.”

Regardless of the exact identity of the new particle, CERN’s scientists say, the highly anticipated discovery heralds a new era in physics.

Full Story: http://media.caltech.edu/press_releases/13526

Also: http://press.web.cern.ch/press/PressReleases/Releases2012/PR16.12E.html

Higgs Hunters Declare Victory – As Significant As DNA Discovery


Professor Sir Peter Knight, President of the Institute of Physics (IOP), has asserted that the discovery of the Higgs is as significant to physics as the discovery of DNA was to biology.

He said, “This is the physics version of the discovery of DNA. It sets the course for a brand new adventure in our efforts to understand the fabric of our Universe.”

His comments follow an announcement by British researchers from the Large Hadron Collider at CERN that they have found a new particle consistent with the long-sought Higgs boson.

Full Story: http://www.iop.org/news/12/july/page_56479.html

Experiment Makes Measurement of Antihydrogen


In a paper published online today by the journal Nature, the ALPHA collaboration at CERN reports an important milestone on the way to measuring the properties of antimatter atoms. This follows news reported in June last year that the collaboration had routinely trapped antihydrogen atoms for long periods of time. ALPHA’s latest advance is the next important milestone on the way to being able to make precision comparisons between atoms of ordinary matter and atoms of antimatter, thereby helping to unravel one of the deepest mysteries in particle physics and perhaps understanding why a Universe of matter exists at all.

“We’ve demonstrated that we can probe the internal structure of the antihydrogen atom,” said ALPHA collaboration spokesman, Jeffrey Hangst, “and we’re very excited about that. We now know that it’s possible to design experiments to make detailed measurements of antiatoms.”

Full Story: http://press.web.cern.ch/press/PressReleases/Releases2012/PR06.12E.html

ATLAS & CMS Experiments Present Higgs Search Status

December 13, 2011 Leave a comment

In a seminar held at CERN today, the ATLAS and CMS experiments presented the status of their searches for the Standard Model Higgs boson. Their results are based on the analysis of considerably more data than those presented at the summer conferences, sufficient to make significant progress in the search for the Higgs boson, but not enough to make any conclusive statement on the existence or non-existence of the elusive Higgs. The main conclusion is that the Standard Model Higgs boson, if it exists, is most likely to have a mass constrained to the range 116-130 GeV by the ATLAS experiment, and 115-127 GeV by CMS. Tantalising hints have been seen by both experiments in this mass region, but these are not yet strong enough to claim a discovery.

Higgs bosons, if they exist, are very short lived and can decay in many different ways. Discovery relies on observing the particles they decay into rather than the Higgs itself. Both ATLAS and CMS have analysed several decay channels, and the experiments see small excesses in the low mass region that has not yet been excluded.

Taken individually, none of these excesses is any more statistically significant than rolling a die and coming up with two sixes in a row. What is interesting is that there are multiple independent measurements pointing to the region of 124 to 126 GeV. It’s far too early to say whether ATLAS and CMS have discovered the Higgs boson, but these updated results are generating a lot of interest in the particle physics community.

Full Story: http://press.web.cern.ch/press/PressReleases/Releases2011/PR25.11E.html

Faster-Than-Light Neutrinos Re-Tested: Same Result

November 18, 2011 1 comment

A fiercely contested experiment that appears to show the accepted speed limit of the Universe can be broken has yielded the same results in a re-run, European physicists said.

But counterparts in the United States said the experiment still did not resolve doubts and the Europeans themselves acknowledged this was not the end of the story.

On Sept. 23, the European team issued a massive challenge to fundamental physics by saying they had measured particles called neutrinos which traveled around six kilometers (3.75 miles) per second faster than the speed of light, determined by Einstein to be the highest velocity possible.

Full Story: http://news.discovery.com/space/faster-than-light-speed-neutrinos-re-run-111118.html#mkcpgn=rssnws1

LHC Proton Run for 2011 Reaches Successful Conclusion

November 1, 2011 Leave a comment

After some 180 days of running and four hundred trillion (4×1014) proton proton collisions, the LHC’s 2011 proton run came to an end at 5.15pm yesterday evening. For the second year running, the LHC team has largely surpassed its operational objectives, steadily increasing the rate at which the LHC has delivered data to the experiments.

At the beginning of the year’s run, the objective for the LHC was to deliver a quantity of data known to physicists as one inverse femtobarn during the course of 2011. The first inverse femtobarn came on 17 June, setting the experiments up well for the major physics conferences of the summer and requiring the 2011 data objective to be revised upwards to five inverse femtobarns. That milestone was passed by 18 October, with the grand total for the year being almost six inverse femtobarns delivered to each of the two general-purpose experiments ATLAS and CMS.

“At the end of this year’s proton running, the LHC is reaching cruising speed,”said CERN’s Director for Accelerators and Technology, Steve Myers. “To put things in context, the present data production rate is a factor of 4 million higher than in the first run in 2010 and a factor of 30 higher than at the beginning of 2011.”

Full Story: http://press.web.cern.ch/press/PressReleases/Releases2011/PR22.11E.html