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Posts Tagged ‘coronal’

CfA-Built Telescope On IRIS Sees First Light


Credit: NASA

Credit: NASA

NASA’s Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) observatory has produced its first images and spectra of a little understood region of the Sun through which the energy that supports the Sun’s hot corona is transported. IRIS was launched on June 27, 2013, and the front cover of the IRIS telescope was opened on July 17.

“Already, we’re finding that IRIS has the capability to reveal a very dynamic and highly structured chromosphere and transition region,” says astrophysicist Hui Tian of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA). “Thin and elongated structures are clearly present in these first-light images, and they evolve quickly in time.”

Important goals of the IRIS mission are to understand how the Sun’s million degree corona is heated and to reveal the genesis of the solar wind.

Full Story: http://www.cfa.harvard.edu/news/2013/pr201321.html

New Images of Solar Wind As It Impacts Earth

August 19, 2011 Leave a comment

CME Impacting WIND Spacecraft

Courtesy SwRI/NASA

Using data collected by NASA’s STEREO spacecraft, researchers at Southwest Research Institute and the National Solar Observatory have developed the first detailed images of solar wind structures as plasma and other particles from a coronal mass ejection (CME) traveled 93 million miles and impacted Earth.

Full Story: http://swri.org/9what/releases/2011/solarwind.htm

New Method Detects Emerging Sunspots Inside the Sun

August 19, 2011 Leave a comment

New Method Detects Emerging Sunspots Inside the Sun

A full disk image of the Sun showing the sunspot group in AR11158 after emergence, observed by SDO/HMI. Courtesy of NASA/SDO and the HMI science teams.

The first clear detection of emerging sunspot regions prior to any indication of the region in magnetograms was published in Science on 19 August 2011.

Sunspots, dark features in the solar photosphere with strong magnetic field, have been observed for more than 400 years. They are the most visible components of regions where solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs) occur, and these eruptive events may cause power outages and interruptions of telecommunication and navigation services on the Earth. Although it is widely believed that sunspot regions are generated in the deep solar interior, the detection of these regions before they emerge from the convection zone into the photosphere has remained undetected until now.

Full Story: http://hmi.stanford.edu/Press/18Aug2011/