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Posts Tagged ‘deep space network’

Cassini Significant Events 02/01/2012 – 02/07/2012

February 10, 2012 Leave a comment

The most recent spacecraft tracking and telemetry data in this reporting period were acquired on Feb. 8 from the Deep Space Network 70 meter Station 14 at Goldstone, California. The Cassini spacecraft is in an excellent state of health with all subsystems operating normally except for the known issues with the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer and the Ultrastable Oscillator. Information on the present position and speed of the Cassini spacecraft may be found on the “Present Position” page at: http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/mission/presentposition/.

This week’s science activities began with multi-instrument observations of Titan from as far as 2.8 million kilometers away, as Cassini continued moving towards apoapse. These activities included a RADAR radiometry observation and a calibration, and observations by the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS), Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) and the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) for atmospheric and cloud monitoring. Following this, the Cosmic Dust Analyzer (CDA) made a 13.5 hour interstellar dust observation.

Later, ISS performed observations of some of Saturn’s small inner moons (part of the Satellite Orbit Campaign), including Janus and Polydeuces, to improve understanding of the orbits of these small satellites. This was followed by a 9.5 hour search for Trojan satellites around the L5 Lagrange point, 60 degrees behind Titan in its orbit.

Finally, ISS made some additional observations in the Satellite Orbit Campaign, and then CIRS, ISS and VIMS made an 11 hour Titan observation from a distance of more than 3.6 million kilometers.

Full Story: http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/news/significantevents/significantevents20120209/

Cassini Significant Events 1/4/12 – 1/10/12

January 17, 2012 Leave a comment

The most recent spacecraft telemetry was acquired on Jan. 9 from the Deep Space Network tracking complex at Goldstone, California. The Cassini spacecraft is in an excellent state of health and with the exception of the CAPS instrument being powered off, all subsystems are operating normally. Information on the present position and speed of the Cassini spacecraft may be found on the “Present Position” page at: http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/mission/presentposition/.

Full Story: http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/news/significantevents/significantevents20120112/