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Posts Tagged ‘Goldstone’

Updated Radar Movie of Asteroid 2005 YU55

November 15, 2011 Leave a comment

NASA Scientists working with the 230-foot-wide (70-meter) Deep Space Network antenna at Goldstone, Calif., have released a second, longer, and more refined, movie clip of asteroid 2005 YU55. The images were generated from data collected at Goldstone on Nov. 7, 2011, between 11:24 a.m. and 1:35 p.m. PST (2:24 p.m. and 4:35 p.m. EST).

The movie clip can be found at: http://1.usa.gov/YU55 .

Each of the 28 frames required 20 minutes of data collection by the Goldstone radar. At the time of the observations, 2005 YU55 was approximately 860,000 miles (1.4 million kilometers) from Earth. The resolution is about 13 feet (4 meters) per pixel. 2005 YU55 takes approximately 18 hours to complete one rotation, so the rotation in the movie appears much more rapid than the actual asteroid rotation speed.

The Goldstone observations utilized a new system to obtain images with a resolution of 4 meters, which is five times finer than the highest resolution previously possible at Goldstone.

Full Story: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.cfm?release=2011-351

NASA Releases Radar Movie of Asteroid 2005 YU55

November 9, 2011 Leave a comment

Scientists working with the 230-foot-wide (70-meter) Deep Space Network antenna at Goldstone, Calif., have generated a short movie clip of asteroid 2005 YU55. The images were generated from data collected at Goldstone on Nov. 7, 2011, between 11:24 a.m. and 1:35 p.m. PST (2:24 p.m. and 4:35 p.m. EST). They are the highest-resolution images ever generated by radar of a near-Earth object.

The short movie clip can be found at: http://1.usa.gov/uVJvmS .

Each of the six frames required 20 minutes of data collection by the Goldstone radar. At the time, 2005 YU55 was approximately 860,000 miles (1.38 million kilometers) away from Earth. Resolution is 4 meters per pixel.
“The movie shows the small subset of images obtained at Goldstone on November 7 that have finished processing. By animating a sequence of radar images, we can see more surface detail than is visible otherwise,” said radar astronomer Lance Benner, the principal investigator for the 2005 YU55 observations, from NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. “The animation reveals a number of puzzling structures on the surface that we don’t yet understand.  To date, we’ve seen less than one half of the surface, so we expect more surprises.”

Full Story: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.cfm?release=2011-346

NASA Captures New Images of Large Asteroid Passing Earth

November 8, 2011 Leave a comment

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

NASA’s Deep Space Network antenna in Goldstone, Calif. has captured new radar images of Asteroid 2005 YU55 passing close to Earth.

The asteroid will safely fly past our planet slightly closer than the moon’s orbit on Nov. 8. The last time a space rock this large came as close to Earth was in 1976, although astronomers did not know about the flyby at the time. The next known approach of an asteroid this size will be in 2028.

The image was taken on Nov. 7 at 11:45 a.m. PST (2:45 p.m. EST/1945 UTC), when the asteroid was approximately 860,000 miles (1.38 million kilometers) away from Earth. Tracking of the aircraft carrier-sized asteroid began at Goldstone at 9:30 a.m. PDT on Nov. 4 with the 230-foot-wide (70-meter) antenna and lasted about two hours, with an additional four hours of tracking planned each day from Nov. 6 – 10.

Radar observations from the Arecibo Planetary Radar Facility in Puerto Rico will begin Nov. 8, the same day the asteroid will make its closest approach to Earth at 3:28 p.m. PST (6:28 p.m. EST/1128 UTC).

Full Story: http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/asteroids/news/yu55-20111107.html

Cassini Significant Events 08/10/11 – 08/16/11

August 19, 2011 Leave a comment

The most recent spacecraft telemetry was acquired on August 16 from the Deep Space Network tracking complex at Goldstone, California. The Cassini spacecraft is in an excellent state of health and all subsystems are operating normally. Information on the present position and speed of the Cassini spacecraft may be found on the “Present Position” page at:http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/mission/presentposition/.

 

Wednesday, Aug. 10 (DOY 222)

 

This week in science was dominated by observations of Saturn by the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS), the Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS), and the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) while the spacecraft was near apoapsis in its orbit. The observations were designed to track wind speeds and study atmospheric composition. The Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) also performed an observation to study the upper atmosphere of Saturn, and ISS and VIMS observed Titan twice (1.5 hr each) as part of the cloud monitoring campaign. ISS made a 14-hour observation of the small irregular outer moon Tarqeq to study its light curve.

 

Thursday, Aug. 11 (DOY 223)

 

In the last week, 771 ISS images and 43 VIMS cubes were generated and distributed.

 

Monday, Aug. 15 (DOY 227)

 

The Navigation Team delivered an orbit determination (OD) solution today in support of an unplanned Saturn/Hyperion live Inertial Vector Propagator (IVP) update, tentatively scheduled for uplink on DOY 230. The need for this live IVP update was not predicted at the start of S69, but pointing offsets were discovered resulting from small execution errors at OTM-287 that propagated as trajectory dispersions over the nearly two months since OTM-287.

 

Tuesday, Aug. 16 (DOY 228)

 

Commands were uplinked to the spacecraft today over Goldstone’s DSS-15 station in support of S69 for the Cosmic Dust Analyzer (CDA) parameter update due to execute on DOY 234. This parameter adjustment is done to avoid saturating one of the instrument’s detectors.

 

The Spacecraft Operations (SCO) team delivered the Cassini Operations Reference Encyclopedia (CORE) V6.1 software today. This is the command and flight rules dictionary. Analysts are given the opportunity to view command and flight rule information associated with a particular sequence through formatted Oracle queries. CORE was updated to remove unused telemetry channel hyperlinks in displayed commands and printed reports.

 

A kickoff meeting was held today for the S72 Sequence Implementation Process. Port 1 for the first set of input files from the teams occurs August 31.