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Posts Tagged ‘Small Magellanic Cloud’

Hubble Finds Source Of Magellanic Stream


Astronomers using NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope have solved a 40-year mystery on the origin of the Magellanic Stream, a long ribbon of gas stretching nearly halfway around our Milky Way galaxy.

The Large and Small Magellanic Clouds, two dwarf galaxies orbiting the Milky Way, are at the head of the gaseous stream. Since the stream’s discovery by radio telescopes in the early 1970s, astronomers have wondered whether the gas comes from one or both of the satellite galaxies. Now, new Hubble observations reveal that most of the gas was stripped from the Small Magellanic Cloud about 2 billion years ago, and a second region of the stream originated more recently from the Large Magellanic Cloud.

“What’s interesting is that all the other nearby satellite galaxies of the Milky Way have lost their gas,” Andrew J. Fox (of the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, Md). said. “The Magellanic Clouds have been able to retain their gas and are still forming stars because they’re more massive than the other satellites. However, as they’re now approaching the Milky Way, they’re feeling its gravity more and also encountering its halo of hot gas, which puts pressure on them.”

Full Story and Images: http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/archive/releases/2013/27/full/

Celestial Bauble Intrigues Astronomers

December 20, 2011 Leave a comment

Credit: X-ray & Optical: NASA/CXC/Univ.Potsdam/L.Oskinova et al

Credit: X-ray & Optical: NASA/CXC/Univ.Potsdam/L.Oskinova et al

With the holiday season in full swing, a new image from an assembly of telescopes has revealed an unusual cosmic ornament. Data from NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory and ESA’s XMM-Newton have been combined to discover a young pulsar in the remains of a supernova located in the Small Magellanic Cloud, or SMC. This would be the first definite time a pulsar, a spinning, ultra-dense star, has been found in a supernova remnant in the SMC, a small satellite galaxy to the Milky Way.

In this composite image, X-rays from Chandra and XMM-Newton have been colored blue and optical data from the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in Chile are colored red and green. The pulsar, known as SXP 1062, is the bright white source located on the right-hand side of the image in the middle of the diffuse blue emission inside a red shell. The diffuse X-rays and optical shell are both evidence for a supernova remnant surrounding the pulsar. The optical data also displays spectacular formations of gas and dust in a star-forming region on the left side of the image. A comparison of the Chandra image with optical images shows that the pulsar has a hot, massive companion.

Full Story: http://www.chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2011/sxp1062/