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Posts Tagged ‘Uranus’

The Moon Photobombs Uranus Live


uranus-11627_640_smObservers in eastern Australia, all of New Zealand, and parts of the South Pacific will see the planet Uranus pass behind the waning crescent Moon in the early morning of June 12, 2015. The precise timing of the event depends on your location. In Adelaide, Australia, Uranus passes behind the Moon at 18:49 UT, just after moonrise, and emerges from the dark part of the crescent Moon’s face at 19:57 UT. In Sydney the occultation begins at 19:01 UT and ends at 20:17 UT.

Observers in the rest of the world will see Uranus close to the crescent Moon in the eastern pre-dawn sky. This presents an excellent opportunity to spot this distant ice giant with a pair of binoculars or a small telescope. Slooh will be presenting live views of the event courtesy of our Australian feed partners. Join us to watch live views of the Solar System in motion!

Link To Full Story And Video Link

Storms On Uranus, Neptune Confined To Upper Atmosphere


The Voyager 2 spacecraft photographed bands of clouds around Neptune during its flyby in 1989. Photo: NASA

The Voyager 2 spacecraft photographed bands of clouds around Neptune during its flyby in 1989. Photo: NASA

Similar to the giant gas planets Jupiter and Saturn, their smaller cousins, Uranus and Neptune, have long been known to harbor swirling clouds and violent winds churning up their atmospheres. Massive bands of jet streams encircling the entire planet have been observed in both cases. But given that Uranus’ atmosphere is believed to be thick enough to swallow the entire Earth, it was not known just how far the weather perturbations reach into the planet’s interior.

Now a team of planetary scientists with the University of Arizona’s Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, including William Hubbard and Adam Showman, has published the results of new analyses that put an upper limit to the weather zone on Uranus and Neptune. According to their data, reported in the journal Nature, the atmosphere on both planets goes from screaming winds of infernal violence to dead-quiet at a much shallower depth than previously thought.

“Our analyses show that the dynamics are confined to a thin weather layer no more than about 680 miles deep,” said Hubbard. “This number is an upper limit, so in reality, it is possible that the atmosphere quiets down even shallower than that.”

Full Story: http://www.uanews.org/story/storms-on-uranus-neptune-confined-to-upper-atmosphere

Solar System Likely Once Had Another Gas-Giant Planet

September 21, 2011 Leave a comment

Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune. Those are the gas giants, the four heavyweights of the solar system. But was there once a fifth?

Maybe so, says a new study by David Nesvorny of the Southwest Research Institute in Boulder, Colorado. He used computer simulations to explore what the solar system may have looked like some four billion years ago.

Full Story: http://www.scientificamerican.com/podcast/episode.cfm?id=solar-system-likely-once-had-anothe-11-09-19